Good Lighting

455588661We’re a few weeks in to 2015—How’s it working out for you? At our house, we finally took down our Christmas lights and garland and put them away. I found myself reflecting on advice I’d heard
New Year’s resolutions—which ones to make, how to make them, and even whether one should make them at all.

The New Year brings on the excitement of new endeavors, the taste of possible victory in making these resolutions stick. But there’s also the drudgery of trying something new, leading to all out defiance in the face of our annual change-making tradition. It’s clear that New Year’s Resolutions result in a mix of hope and anxiety. And maybe it’s this combo that trips us up on our way to improving our lives.

So, how do we get there? I have one recommendation: Good Lighting.

Good lighting is incredibly important. Just think about how when you’re getting dressed, taking a photo, decorating your home or just reading a book, you’re constantly adjusting your lighting. Not enough lighting creates shadows and lack of clarity. I once scared myself when I saw myself in my car’s rearview mirror after putting on my makeup with too-low lighting in the room. I looked like I’d had a collision with Sephora! Read More

This Boob Has Important Lessons to Share

 

Heart framing on woman chest with pink badge to support breast cancer causeFive years ago, a small sign signaled a ginormous change coming my way.

When I discovered a small, painful lump under my right arm I assumed that I had mastitis and went to see my obstetrician for a solution. As a tired mom with a nursing fourteen-month-old and a five-year old child, I didn’t have time for this. After trying to treat what we thought was an infection for another week, my doctor sent me to radiology for an ultrasound. I was still in a state of denial when the PRN gently held my hand as the calm surgeon injected a biopsy needle into the hard, round lump under my arm. It was confirmed: I had breast cancer. Read More

Suspending Disbelief

Woman on zip lineSummer has passed us by unbelievably fast. As I stand at the threshold of Fall, I am still waxing nostalgic for the days of little to no schedules, constant piles of wet towels from trips to the swimming pool and late nights arguing and giggling over board games as a family. Also, I find it hard to believe that it’s been months since I have posted a blog. I took a b
reak in order to become more focused on my book. My book efforts resulted in feedback from a publisher and an editor that I need to reconfigure it from a self-help guide in to a memoir. I walked away discouraged and in disbelief. As a matter of fact, I have allowed myself to be suspended in disbelief. A memoir! Surely, you are not talking to me. Then I allowed myself to become engulfed by my fear and decided to use the better part of this summer to work through this fear. Actually, this turned out to be a great idea. Life has an amazing way of catering to our desires and made sure to dial up an experience that would teach me about working through my fear. Rather than be suspended in disbelief, God wants us to be suspended in belief.

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I’m Gonna Let It Shine!

Sport success on sunset background

It’s October. I always feel nervous energy when October approaches. I gave this some thought and realized that October is a very significant month for me. It’s one of my favorite times of the year as the Central Texas summer heat begins to fade. Everyone is giddy, including squirrels, dogs and children. It feels like the month when we finally move past our summer fun hangover and pick up our tempo for school, work, and other life commitments. It’s the month of my lovely Mother’s birthday. It’s become the month for my favorite Austin festival, Austin City Limits. But it was also in October that two of our dogs, in separate years, passed away.

This month also happens to Breast Cancer Awareness month. And, as fate would have it, in October of 2009, I first discovered a lump under my arm. That November a biopsy confirmed my deepest fear, just before my 43rd birthday. Breast cancer, Stage III. This diagnosis led me to an intense medical regimen complete with chemotherapy and antibody infusions, a radical single-mastectomy, and extensive radiation therapy for the better part of a year. It also led me on a miraculous, personal journey—a journey that I’m still on. Read More